Anti-smart growth advocate defends urbanism

It's not often you'll find people arguing against smart growth while also arguing for urbanism. When it happens, one wonders if it was a mistake. That seems to be the case with a screed penned by Lawrence McQuillan of the Independent Institute in Oakland, though his argument is worth highlighting. While arguing that density isn't a very effective way of decreasing greenhouse gases, he makes the market urbanist argument I've made time and again in this blog:

If governments ended their war on home construction, builders could buy the land they need to construct the housing that local people want, not housing that politicians and smart-growth activists want. That would increase the stock of affordable housing and help the environment too.

While McQuillan digs at smart growth, his critique more aptly applies to our country's existing urban policies. We have spent so long trying to structure and restrict where and how our cities grow, especially within already built-up areas, we've made our cities totally unaffordable for those who want to live there and our suburbs too far from the core for those who want the big-yard, drivable lifestyle.

McQuillan adds: "[H]ere lies the folly of government master plans to control growth. People are not chess pieces to be moved about at the will of politicians and bureaucrats. People have dreams and aspirations for themselves and their families." And yet through policies that have been in place for over 60 years, politicians and bureaucrats have played a helluva lot of chess with our lives.

If governments like those in Marin lifted density and parking controls and focused instead on maintaining small-town character, if they stopped artificially segregating commercial and residential uses, if the federal government stopped its $450 billion annual subsidy for single-family home development*, if the state stopped subsidizing 70 percent of road maintenance and construction with sales taxes and other non-user fees, perhaps we'd see some equilibrium return to our transportation and housing markets. We wouldn't need regional housing quotas or ABAG or affordable housing grants because the housing market would simply meet the demand.

It's unfortunate that only one kind of government intervention - the kind he doesn't like - is the target of McQuillan's ire. The massive and ongoing interventions in our real estate market deserve just such a libertarian flaying.

*Yes, that's almost a half-trillion dollars every year in direct and indirect subsidies for single-family home development.

Hat tip to Save Marinwood for the article.